Powhatan Civil War Round Table
Powhatan Civil War Round Table
Powhatan Civil War Round Table Powhatan Civil War Roundtable Powhatan Civil War Round Table
Powhatan Civil War Round Table Powhatan Civil War Round Table
Powhatan Civil War Round Table
About the Civil War Roundtable Membership Information Old News If Ya Want Order Now! Links to Civil War Sites Town Hall Sometimes Known as a Civil War Blog
Powhatan Civil War Round Table

DISPATCHES FROM THE POWHATAN CIVIL WAR ROUNDTABLE NEWSLETTER

 

FEBRUARY 2017

ROBERT M. DUNKERLY

RAILROADS IN THE CIVIL WAR

This month we welcome Robert M. Dunkerly, a historian, award-winning author, and speaker who is actively involved in historic preservation and research.  He holds a degree in History from St. Vincent College and a Masters in Historic Preservation from Middle Tennessee State University.  Robert has worked at nine historic sites, written twelve books and over twenty articles.  His research includes archaeology, colonial life, military history, and historic commemoration.  He is a past President of the Richmond Civil War Round Table, and serves on the Preservation Commission for the American Revolution Round Table-Richmond.  He has taught courses at Central Virginia Community College, the University of Richmond, and the Virginia Historical Society.  Dunkerly is currently a Park Ranger at Richmond National Battlefield Park.  He has visited over 400 battlefields and over 1000 historic sites worldwide.  When not reading or writing, he enjoys hiking, camping, and photography.  

NEXT MONTH

Thursday, March 17, 2017 – John Quarstein - Topic to be announced.

SPECIAL LOCAL EVENT, FEBRUARY 13, 6:30 to 8:30 P.M.

History Happy Hour at Capital Ale House

Yankee Doodle to Dixie: The Importance of Music in Early Virginia

Music played a vital role in the social development of early Virginia. From formal dances to casual gatherings, discover how Virginians integrated music into their daily lives, including how Civil War soldiers used music to brighten up their days during one of America's darkest times. Led by Josh LeHuray, of the American Civil War Museum.

REMINDER: 2017 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP DUES

Your Membership Dues for 2017 are now due. With no increase in price to PCWRT Membership, we hope you will encourage friends and neighbors to also join.  All dues must be received by March 31, 2017 to insure continuation of your membership

  • Individual Membership - $25.00
  • Family Membership    -    $35.00     

Membership includes 12 newsletters per year and entitles you to membership rates at our monthly dinner meetings. 

Remit your membership today to:

Powhatan Civil War Round Table

P.O. Box 1144

Powhatan, Virginia 23139

PCWRT VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

If you have an interest in becoming more involved with the PCWRT, or have a special skill to offer, why not consider volunteering? New ideas and new people are the life-blood of any organization, and the PCWRT is no different. We need new volunteers with new ideas to move forward into our second decade.  To get involved, please see one of our Leadership Committee members at our next meeting.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

See our website’s FAQ page for a list of our most frequently asked questions. Don’t see your question addressed there? E-mail us at info@PowhatanCWRT.org

THIS MONTH IN THE CIVIL WAR 1863 - Courtesy History Learning Site

February 1, 1863 - The dollar used in the Confederacy was worth just 20% of what it did when the war broke out. Such was the success of the Federal Navy in the rivers of the South that a decision was taken to remove any stores of cotton away from rivers. Any cotton that could not be moved was burned to save it falling into the hands of the Union.

February 2, 1863 - Grant started his attempt to build a canal around to the rear of Vicksburg using the Yazoo River as his source of water. By doing this, Grant’s men would avoid the Confederate artillery stationed in Vicksburg.

February 3, 1863 - The French continued to offer attempts at mediation. Secretary of State Seward met the French ambassador in Washington DC to discuss such a move.

February 5, 1863 - The British government announced that any attempts at mediation would result in failure. Their lack of action was in stark contrast to the pro-active stance of the French government.

February 6, 1863 - The Federal government officially announced that it had rejected French offers of mediation.

February 9, 1863 - General Hooker started his reorganization of the Army of the Potomac. He decided that his first task was to improve its intelligence gathering. On his arrival at his headquarters he found no document that could inform him about the strength of the Army of Virginia. General Butterfield wrote: “There was no means, no organization, and no apparent effort to obtain such information. We were almost as ignorant of the enemy in our immediate front as if they had been in China. An efficient organization for that purpose was instituted, by which we were so enabled to get correct and proper information of the enemy, their strengths and movements.”

February 11, 1863 - Hooker then turned his attention to the conditions his men lived under, which he linked to the high levels of desertion. New huts were built that could cope with the winter weather and fresh fruit and vegetables were provided. Medical facilities were also improved. The impact on desertions was dramatic and even men who had deserted returned to their regiments.

February 12, 1863 - The Union’s naval blockade had a disastrous impact on the South’s economy and the river patrols of its flat-bottomed boats were equally as successful. However, the sheer size of the fleet operating meant that the Federal government faced a supply problem no one had encountered before. It was estimated that the North had to supply 70,000 bushels of coal each month to keep the fleet on the move. Food and water could be obtained locally but there was little chance of getting hold of large quantities of coal.

February 13, 1863 - General Hooker made what was to prove to be one of the most important changes to the Army of the Potomac during the war. Scattered cavalry units were amalgamated into one corps. No one was immediately appointed to command it as no army commander had ever had access to one concentrated cavalry unit. Hooker was willing to wait to appoint the most suitable candidate – he later selected General Stoneman to command it.

February 16, 1863 - The Senate passed the Conscription Act, which was passed, as volunteers for the Union army were not forthcoming.

February 22, 1863 - Hooker believed that his changes were starting to have an impact as the levels of scurvy and intestinal diseases dropped quite markedly.

February 25, 1863 - Congress authorized a national system of banking.

______________________________________________________

SCROLL DOWN TO READ PAST NEWSLETTERS

______________________________________________________

DECEMBER 2016

ANNUAL CHRISTMAS DINNER

We close out our 13th year with our annual Christmas dinner at the County Seat Restaurant on Thursday, December 15th.  With holiday music performed by the Judes Ferry Band, we look forward to celebrating the season with our members and guests.  Information about upcoming presentations in 2017 will soon follow, and we wish you and yours a Merry Christmas and Happy New Year!

UPCOMING TOPICS

2017 events to be announced.

PCWRT VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES

If you have an interest in becoming more involved with the PCWRT, or have a special skill to offer, why not consider volunteering? New ideas and new people are the life-blood of any organization, and the PCWRT is no different. We need new volunteers with new ideas to move forward into our second decade.  To get involved, please see one of our Leadership Committee members at our next meeting.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

See our website’s FAQ page for a list of our most frequently asked questions. Don’t see your question addressed there? E-mail us at info@PowhatanCWRT.org

CIVIL WAR QUOTES

“The north wind comes reeling in fitful gushes through the iron bars, and jingles a sleigh bell in the prisoner's ear, and puffs in his pale face with a breath suggestively odorous of eggnog....  Christmas Day!  A day which was made for smiles, not sighs - for laughter, not tears - for the hearth, not prison.”

Lt. Col. Frederic Cavada, Christmas 1863, Libby Prison, Richmond

THIS MONTH IN THE CIVIL WAR 1862 - Courtesy History Learning Site

December 1, 1862 - Lincoln addressed the 37th Congress in the capital and once again announced his intention of abolishing slavery within the United States

December 7, 1862 - A battle fought at Prairie Grove left 167 Union soldiers dead, 798 wounded and 183 missing. The Confederates lost 300 killed, 800 wounded and 250 missing

December 10, 1862 - The House of Representatives passed a bill to create the state of West Virginia.

December 13, 1862 - Burnside started his attack against Fredericksburg. However, the delay in doing so allowed Lee’s men time to dig themselves into well-fortified positions both in the town and in the hills that surrounded it. All attacks were repulsed. An attack on Confederate troops dug in on Marye’s Heights led to many Unionist deaths. By the end of the day the Army of the Potomac had lost 1200 killed, 9000 wounded and 2145 missing. Many of these were at Marye’s Heights. The Confederates had lost 570 killed, 3870 wounded and 127 missing. Many of the wounded left out on the battlefield died of the cold during the night. Lee was heard to say: “It is well that war is so terrible; we should grow too fond of it.”

December 14, 1862 - Burnside wanted to repeat the assault on Fredericksburg but was persuaded otherwise by his commanders in the field. The Army of the Potomac camped out along the Rappahannock River.

December 17, 1862 - General Grant’s reputation was tainted when he issued General Order Number 11, which expelled Jews from his department because “they are a class violating every regulation of trade established by the Treasury Department.”

December 20, 1862 - A Confederate force attacked a major Union supply base at Holly Springs, Mississippi. Over $1 million in supplies was seized along with 1000 prisoners. Such a loss of supplies meant that Grant had to postpone his attack on Vicksburg.

December 23, 1862 - Jefferson Davis names General Butler, formally in charge of New Orleans, an outlaw and an enemy of Mankind. Davis stated that Butler would be hanged if the Confederates captured him.

December 28, 1862 - A unit of Union troops captured a considerable amount of Confederate supplies at Van Buren, Arkansas.

December 31, 1862 - Lincoln met Burnside to discuss what went wrong at Fredericksburg. The ironclad ‘Monitor’ sank in a storm.

______________________________________________________

TO READ PAST PCWRT NEWSLETTERS, CLICK HERE

______________________________________________________

 

 

 

Powhatan Civil War Round Table Powhatan Civil War Roundable Home Frequently Asked Questions Contact the Civil War Rountable

 


Powhatan Civil War Round Table